Research leaders

Professor Kim Vincs

Director

Kim Vincs is a leading researcher in the creative arts, with six Australian Research Council grants, 40+ industry partnerships, and 20+ arts/science collaborations across motion capture, game development, robotics, haptics, app design, 3D stereoscopy, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, augmented reality, cognitive psychology, biomechanics, mathematics, architecture and exercise science. Vincs’s industry partnerships include national and International companies such as Autodesk, Motion Analysis, Act3animation, Iloura, Alt.vfx, Arts Access Victoria, Victorian Opera and Australian Dance Theatre.

She has commercial motion capture credits including the Cannes Silver Lion winning Nocturnal Migration. Kim integrates scientific, technological and artistic methodologies to deliver innovative research to digital and performing arts industries, companies and communities. Her work spans creative technology for performance, digital scenography, VR, AR and robotics applications for motion capture technology. She was a choreographer for 20 years, and created 21 digital technology artworks for the Melbourne Festival and White Night Melbourne. Recent works include The Crack Up, which premiered at the Merlyn Theatre, Coopers Malthouse, in October 2014; Multiverse, with Garry Stewart and Australian Dance Theatre and 3D digital scenography for the Victorian Opera’s production of The Flying Dutchman, 2015 and Four Saints in Three Acts, 2016. Her works have been shortlisted for Greenroom, Australian Dance and AEAF awards. The Flying Dutchman was a finalist in Unity’s 2015 Unite.

In 2017, she led an interdisciplinary and cross-institutional team with an ARC LIEF grant, creating an Embodied Movement Network. Vincs is an award-winning educator with expertise in collaborative, interdisciplinary curriculum design linking art, technology, science and humanities. She has two Carrick National Teaching Awards; a National Teaching Award, Arts and Humanities and Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning. Vincs joined the Department of Film and Animation at Swinburne in 2017 where she is a Research Director. Before joining Swinburne, she founded Deakin University’s Deakin Motion.Lab.

Professor Angela Ndalianis

Director

Angela Ndalianis is a Research Professor of Media and Entertainment. Her research focuses on entertainment culture, media technology history and how they mediate our experience of the world. Her expertise is in the transformative nature of media technologies and how they impact on embodiment, senses and perception. Her publications include Neo-Baroque Aesthetics and Contemporary Entertainment (2004), Science Fiction Experiences (2010), The Horror Sensorium: Media and the Senses (2012); and the edited books - The Contemporary Comic Book Superhero (2009); Neo-baroques: From Latin America to the Hollywood Blockbuster (co-edited, 2016), and Fans and Videogames: Histories, Fandom, Archives (co-edited, 2017).

She has been the recipient of seven ARC grants. Her three ARC Linkage grants (‘Superheroes: Creative Force, Cultural Zeitgeist and Transmedia Phenomenon’, 2016-19; ‘Play It Again: Creating a Playable History of Australasian Digital Games, for Industry, Community and Research Purposes’ 2011-15 and ‘Play It Again: Preserving Australian videogame history of the 1990s’, 2018-21) are in partnership with ACMI. Her ARC Discovery Grants were on theme park experiences, theme park cities, robots as science fiction and as reality, and the baroque/neo-baroque construction of space and sensory experiences in 17th Century Rome and 21st Century Las Vegas. She was a lead investigator on a Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Grant examining transatlantic continuation of the baroque, 2007-15.

She is currently one of the researchers on a Danish/international collaboration – ‘Imagining the Impossible: The Fantastic as Media Entertainment and Play’ – which is funded by the Independent Research Fund of Denmark. She is working on three books: Batman: Myth and Superhero; Robots and Entertainment Culture; and Experiencing Space: Sensory Encounters from Baroque Rome to Neo-Baroque Las Vegas (with Lisa Beaven) supported by an ARC Discovery Grant. She was the H.C.Andersen Institute/University of Southern Denmark Visiting Professor 2015-18, and Visiting Professor University of Venice IUAV, March-June 2018.

Theme leader

Melanie Swalwell

Theme Leader

Melanie Swalwell is Professor of Digital Media Heritage. Her research centres on newer media with particular attention to media arts and digital games, as well as the intersections of these. Melanie has authored chapters and articles in both traditional and interactive formats, curated exhibitions and datasets, collected popular memories, and organised the preservation of digital artefacts. She is co-editor of The Pleasures of Computer Gaming: Essays on cultural history, theory and aesthetics (McFarland, 2008), and Fans and Videogames: Histories, fandom, archives (Routledge, 2017).

A former ARC Future Fellow, she is currently completing a monograph, Homebrew Gaming and the Beginnings of Vernacular Digitality (MIT Press) and editing another two collections, Game History and the Local, and Crafting, Hacking, Making. Her grant projects include: Archiving Australian Media Arts: Towards a method and national collection (ARC Linkage, 2019-21); Play It Again: Preserving Australian videogame history of the 1990s (ARC Linkage, 2019-21); Creative Micro-computing in Australia, 1976-1992 (ARC Future Fellowship 2014-18); Play It Again: Creating a Playable History of Australasian Digital Games, for Industry, Community and Research Purposes (ARC Linkage, 2012-14).

She has presented her research at many conferences nationally and internationally. Recent invited addresses and keynotes include: the Central and Eastern European Game Studies conference, CEEGS, Trnava, Slovak Republic, 2017; the Digital Games Research Association DiGRA, Melbourne 2017; the New Media Histories conference, Lodz, 2014; the First International Histories of Games conference, Montreal, 2013; the Australasian Interactive Entertainment Conference, Melbourne, 2013; and the inaugural Digital Nationz Expo, Auckland, 2013.

Development team

Our specialist in house development team supports creative practice research and development in immersive and interactive media. We are experts in all aspects of motion capture and AR, VR and MR development, providing end-to-end support – from ideation and prototype to finished product. If you can think it, we can do it.

Stephen Jeal

Technical Manager

Stephen Jeal is a Technical Artist and teacher, specializing in 3D modelling, motion capture and visual effects for both film and games. With a knack for problem-solving and an eye for detail, Stephen is completely dedicated to creating the best possible content for every project.

Casey Dalbo

Technical Artist

Casey is a 3D Artist and Instructor. She spends most of her time at the studio modelling and texturing high-quality props and assets to form immersive 3D worlds. Casey enjoys experimenting with different art styles and pipelines, as well as learning new tools to see if they can be useful for project workflows. 

Casey Richardson

Technical Artist

Casey Richardson is a Technical Artist, teacher and part-time hobbyist. His passion for 3d art, motion capture, games and film allow him to tackle tasks with fresh and new ideas. Casey is always striving to expand his skills, discover new workflows, and bring creativity to every project.

Joshua Reason

Programmer

Joshua is a software developer with a background in VR and Game development. He collaborates with artists to bring life to transformative media projects. In his down time, Joshua focuses on Pipeline development where he creates tools to ease the work of his fellow teammates.

Stephen Jeal

Technical Director

Stephen Jeal is a Technical Artist and teacher, specializing in 3D modelling, motion capture and visual effects for both film and games. With a knack for problem-solving and an eye for detail, Stephen is completely dedicated to creating the best possible content for every project.

Casey Dalbo

Technical Artist

Casey is a 3D Artist and Instructor. She spends most of her time at the studio modelling and texturing high-quality props and assets to form immersive 3D worlds. Casey enjoys experimenting with different art styles and pipelines, as well as learning new tools to see if they can be useful for project workflows. 

Casey Richardson

Technical Artist

Casey Richardson is a Technical Artist, teacher and part-time hobbyist. His passion for 3d art, motion capture, games and film allow him to tackle tasks with fresh and new ideas. Casey is always striving to expand his skills, discover new workflows, and bring creativity to every project.

Joshua Reason

Programmer

Joshua is a software developer with a background in VR and Game development. He collaborates with artists to bring life to transformative media projects. In his down time, Joshua focuses on Pipeline development where he creates tools to ease the work of his fellow teammates.

Research team

The Centre for Transformative Media Technologies brings together over 20 researchers, artists and developers from the creative arts, humanities and social sciences. We work collaboratively across disciplinary and conceptual lines to understand and proactively advance the power of new media technologies to transform art, culture, industry and human experience.

César Albarrán-Torres

César is a lecturer in Media and Communication. His current research focuses on what he calls gamble-play media, hybrid platforms where gambling and digital interactive media intersect. Other research interests include film and television, as well as the negotiations between social media and politics in Mexico, particularly concerning the drug cartels. His book Digital Gambling: Theorizing Gamble-Play Media was published in April 2018. He is the former editor of Cine PREMIERE (Mexico) and the founding editor of www.cinepremiere.com.mx, the most widely read film website in the Spanish-speaking world.

Jessica Balanzategui

Jessica Balanzategui is a lecturer in Cinema and Screen Studies. Her research examines childhood and national identity in global film and television; the impact of technological and industrial change on screen genres and entertainment cultures; and vernacular storytelling and aesthetics in digital cultures. Jessica is the author of The Uncanny Child in Transnational Cinema (2018), founding editor of Amsterdam University Press’s book series, “Horror and Gothic Media Cultures”, and an editor of Refractory: A Journal of Entertainment Media.

Liam Burke

Liam Burke is the coordinator of the Cinema and Screen Studies Major. Liam has written and edited a number of books including Superhero Movies, Fan Phenomena: Batman, and The Comic Book Film Adaptation, and the co-edited collection The Superhero (in press, 2019). Liam is a chief investigator on the Superheroes research project with ACMI, which was responsible for Cleverman: The Exhibition and Superheroes: Realities Collide VR experience. Liam directed the documentary short film @HOME as part of the New Media, Ageing, and Migration.

Steven Conway

Steven Conway is senior lecturer in Games & Interactivity. He has presented on many aspects of play, philosophy, aesthetics and culture and has had a variety of articles published in journals such as Convergence, Eludamos, Game Studies, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, the Sociology of Sport Journal and Westminster Papers in Communication & Culture. Steven is also co-editor of the first collection in academia on the relationship between policy and digital games, Video Game Policy: Production, Distribution and Consumption.

Kay Cook

Kay Cook is an ARC Future Fellow and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences. Her work explores how new and developing social policies such as welfare-to-work, child support and child care policies, transform relationships between individuals, families and the state. Her research has contributed to the development of the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2010 General Social Survey, the Australian Law Reform Commission inquiry into Family Violence and Commonwealth Law, and the Parliamentary Inquiry into the Child Support Program.
anne cranny-francis

Anne Cranny-Francis

Anne Cranny-Francis is a Professor and Adjunct Research Fellow at Swinburne University of Technology. Her research on the body has combined with the study of multimedia in extensive work on the relationship between individual subjects, sensory regimes, cultures and contemporary technologies, particularly touch-based (haptic) technologies. Her books include Popular Culture (1994), The Body in the Text (1995), Multimedia: Texts and Contexts (2005) and Technology and Touch: the Biopolitics of Emerging Technologies (2013).

Lisa Given

Lisa Given is Associate Dean, Research and Development, for the Faculty of Health, Arts and Design. She is President of the Association for Information Science and Technology, and Lead Investigator of a number of ARC Linkage and Discovery projects. Lisa co-authored the new edition of Looking for Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking, Needs and Behavior (2016) and is author of 100 Questions (and Answers) About Qualitative Research (2016). She is also the editor of The Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods (2008).

Jock Given

Jock Given researches, writes and teaches about media and communications policy, business, law and history. His work has been published in Telecommunications Policy, Journal of Information Policy, Media and Communication, Business History, Media History, Australian Economic History Review, Historical Journal of Film Radio and Television and Historical Records of Australian Science. His radio documentaries the Crawfords and Television and Ernest Fisk and Wireless were broadcast by ABC Radio National's Hindsight program in 2014 and 2012. He is also a founding associate editor of International Journal of Digital Television (Intellect).

Daniel Golding

Daniel Golding is a Lecturer in Media and Communications and is interested in the intersection of media history, cinema, videogames, and music. He co-hosts a podcast about film music called Art of the Score, and his channel has achieved almost one million views. He was the Director of the Freeplay Independent Games Festival (2014-17), and his academic publications include Game Changers: From Minecraft to Misogyny, the Fight for the Future of Videogames (with Leena van Deventer, 2016), Star Wars After Lucas (2019) and he has published articles on VR, cinema, and videogame.

Colleen Murrell

Colleen Murrell is Associate Professor and Discipline Coordinator of Journalism. She researches international newsgathering, transnational broadcasting, digital technology, social media and analytics, particularly as it relates to journalism. She is interested in exploring projects related to artificial intelligence, augmented reality, ‘automatic video,’ 360 video, virtual reality and data-to-text automation or ‘robot journalism.’ Colleen has worked for international news organisations including the BBC, ITN, Associated Press, SBS and the ABC as a producer, reporter and news editor. Colleen's research is published widely in national and international journals.

John McCormick

John McCormick is a technology-based artist and researcher. He is Lecturer in Interactive Media at Swinburne teaching in the areas of Previsualization and Mixed Reality. His areas of interest include human-robot interaction, artificial intelligence, augmented, virtual and mixed realities, human movement and artificial neural networks. He has collaborated on works worldwide, including at peak festivals ISEA, ZERO1SJ, SIGGRAPH, Melbourne Festival, Venice Biennale, Siggraph Asia, Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) London, Ars Electronica and Art Science Museum Singapore.

Simone Taffe

Simone Taffe is Professor in Communication Design. Simone worked as a graphic designer and design manager for over fifteen years, including managing the City of Melbourne’s design department. Simone was instrumental in establishing the Swinburne Design Factory, providing an international authentic learning platform for multi-disciplined student teams. Her students work with genuine clients and real-world design scenarios, including branding, websites, games and service designs, so that they are equipped to excel in the workplace. Simone's research is in co-design and end-user participation in the design process.

James Verdon

James Verdon is Head of Film and Animation. His creative practice spans video installation, moving image for theatre and performance, broadcast television, and experimental film. His current research examines the nexus between the real and screen-based representations of reality, particularly focussing on the technological mediation of this relationship. Verdon has exhibited screen-based work at numerous international venues including University of Southern California, Goethe-Institut in Berlin, and the Bangkok International Film Festival, and nationally at a wide range of venues including the National Gallery of Victoria, The Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne Museum, and The Australian Centre for Photography.

Max Schleser

Max Schleser is Senior Lecturer in Film and Television, Co-Founder of the Mobile Innovation Network & Association and Screening Director of the International Mobile Innovation Screening & Festival. Max’s research expertise are Immersive Media with a focus on Cinematic VR and interactive filmmaking. His experimental films, moving-image arts, cinematic VR projects and community-engaged documentaries are screened at film festivals. exhibited in galleries and museums, and broadcast on TV and online. He conceptualised and conducted digital storytelling workshops for a number of city councils in Australia, New Zealand and the UK.
MINA: www.mina.pro
Max’s show-reel: www.schleser.nz | Behance

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