Collaborative Embodied Movement Design Network

Collaborative Embodied Movement Design Network

The project explores the historic, creative and artistic development of the superhero across multiple media.

Fund

ARC Linkage, Infrastructure and Equipment Scheme, Swinburne Research, DVCR&D – Internal contributions, The University of Melbourne, RMIT University, Deakin University Fund Scheme

Investigators

Kim Vincs
Troy Innocent

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Star Wars After Lucas: A Critical Guide to the Future of the Galaxy

Star Wars After Lucas: A Critical Guide to the Future of the Galaxy

Focusing on The Force Awakens (2015), Rogue One (2016), The Last Jedi (2017), and the television series Rebels (2014–18), Dan Golding explores the significance of pop culture nostalgia in overcoming the skepticism, if not downright hostility, that greeted the Star Wars relaunch. In its granular textual readings, broad cultural scope, and insights into the complexities of the multimedia galaxy, this book is as entertaining as it is enlightening.

Fund

Investigators

Dan Golding

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away—way back in the twenty-first century’s first decade—Star Wars seemed finished. Then in 2012 George Lucas shocked the entertainment world by selling the franchise, along with Lucasfilm, to Disney. This is the story of how, over the next five years, Star Wars went from near-certain extinction to what Wired magazine would call “the forever franchise,” with more films in the works than its first four decades had produced. Focusing on The Force Awakens (2015), Rogue One (2016), The Last Jedi (2017), and the television series Rebels (2014–18), Dan Golding explores the significance of pop culture nostalgia in overcoming the skepticism, if not downright hostility, that greeted the Star Wars relaunch. At the same time he shows how Disney, even as it tapped a backward-looking obsession, was nonetheless creating genuinely new and contemporary entries in the Star Wars universe.

A host of cultural factors and forces propelled the Disney-engineered Star Wars renaissance, and all figure in Golding’s deeply informed analysis: from John Williams’s music in The Force Awakens to Peter Cushing’s CGI face in Rogue One, to Carrie Fisher’s passing, to the rapidly changing audience demographic. Star Wars after Lucas delves into the various responses and political uses of the new Star Wars in a wider context, as in reaction videos on YouTube and hate-filled, misogynistic online rants. In its granular textual readings, broad cultural scope, and insights into the complexities of the multimedia galaxy, this book is as entertaining as it is enlightening, an apt reflection of the enduring power of the Star Wars franchise. Published by the University of Minnesota Press

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Superheroes: Creative Force, Cultural Zeitgeist and Transmedia Phenomenon

Superheroes: Creative Force, Cultural Zeitgeist and Transmedia Phenomenon

The project explores the historic, creative and artistic development of the superhero across multiple media.

Fund

ARC Linkage Projects Scheme, Australian Centre for the Moving Image, 2016-19

Investigators

Angela Ndalianis (TMT)
Liam Burke (TMT) 
Ian Gordon (National University of Singapore)
Elizabeth McFarlane (Melbourne University)
Wendy Haslem (Melbourne University)

The figure of the superhero has loomed in the popular imagination for generations, providing a common language for understanding the diversity of lived human experience. This research project is an Australian Research Council funded Linkage project that focuses on the phenomenon of the superhero figure from its beginnings up to its contemporary manifestation. The project explores the historic, creative and artistic development of the superhero across multiple media.

Outcomes: 3 anthologies, edited journal, public events and 2 international conferences, a VR experience at ACMI – Superheroes: Realities Collide – at ACMI, and Cleverman: the Exhibition at ACMI in December 2018.

Traditional and non-traditional research outcomes have included the Cleverman: The Exhibition at ACMI; the Superheroes: Realities Collide VR experience at ACMI Screen Worlds, created by Visitor Vision; two major conferences Superhero Identities and Superheroes Beyond; the Senses of Cinema dossier on Australian Superheroes and the ground-breaking television series, Cleverman; and the edited collections The Superhero Symbol: Media, Culture, and Politics (Rutgers University Press, 2019) and Superheroes Beyond: Wider critical perspectives on a transcendent archetype (University of Texas Press, in press 2020)

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60+ Online: Enhancing Social Inclusion through Digital Stories and Social Media Participation

60+ Online: Enhancing Social Inclusion through Digital Stories and Social Media Participation

Seniors are amongst the most digitally excluded in Australia. The 60+ Online project fostered digital inclusion amongst 22 Australian seniors (64-86 years), with varied digital skills, and socio-economic/cultural backgrounds.

Fund

Telstra Digital Inclusion Index, Swinburne Research DVCR&D – Internal Contributions, Boroondara City Council, Knox City Council Fund Scheme

Investigators

Max Schleser (TMT)
Diana Bossio
Anthony McCosker
Hilary Davis

Seniors are amongst the most digitally excluded in Australia. The 60+ Online project fostered digital inclusion amongst 22 Australian seniors (64-86 years), with varied digital skills, and socio-economic/cultural backgrounds. 

Within workshops, seniors were encouraged to draw upon personal and community interests to inform storyboarding and digital story development. Digital stories were generated using iPads and smartphones, and edited using Adobe Premiere Clip. Social media sites Facebook and Instagram, facilitated shared digital skills development, supported by workshop participants and researchers. Regardless of skills at outset, every senior produced their own digital story. These were showcased at festivals, City Council events, and hosted on YouTube: 

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Free from Violence

Free from Violence

The Preventing Elder Abuse project develops and evaluates a community-based digital intervention into ageism as one of the primary drivers of elder abuse.

Fund

Department of Health and Human Services

Investigators

Max Schleser (TMT)
Diana Bossio
Anthony McCosker
Hilary Davis

The Preventing Elder Abuse project develops and evaluates a community-based digital intervention into ageism as one of the primary drivers of elder abuse. The digital intervention will be informed by a direct participation consultation process, which will contribute to the development of experiences of ageism as an evidence base around elder abuse. The evidence base will be used by Swinburne University researchers to produce a digital intervention, developed through a co-design model working with older people in the Eastern regions of Melbourne. 

The outcome of the digital intervention will be to contribute to and enhance the existing community education packages delivered by ECLC on elder abuse.  In addition to this, the co-created digital intervention will be shared more broadly across the sector to assist in building capacity of the Eastern Region workforce to better understand the links between the drivers of elder abuse and elder abuse.

Swinburne researchers will also lead an evaluation of the project to ensure sustainability and scalability of the project for future funding opportunities, and potential expansion of phase two to included targeted messages for specific cohorts across the community.

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New Media, Ageing, and Migration

New Media, Ageing, and Migration

This research project explores an often overlooked aspect of new media and migration. Working with Melbourne’s older Irish community the project explores how older people who migrated before the availability of new media make use of digital communications technologies.  

Fund

Swinburne University of Technology

Investigators

Liam Burke

Modern Irish history has been marked by emigration, with the Global Financial Crisis prompting another mass departure. Yet, the Irish media was quick to suggest that modern expatriates will not be ‘lost’, when they can so easily be tagged, tweeted, and skyped. Liam directed the documentary short film @HOME as part of the New Media, Ageing, and Migration research team, which he leads. The film was screened in competition at a number of international film festivals and was broadcast on Irish television. 

This documentary short film focuses on those Irish people who moved to Australia before the availability of new media. Stretching back to the 1940s @HOME provides a loving portrait of those brave emigrants who moved to the other side of the world when contact with Ireland was limited to occasional letters and a phone call once a year. 

Featuring groups such as Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann, Cumann Gaeilge na hAstraile, and the Irish Australian Athletic Association, this documentary follows these older migrants as they engage with new media and the web as a means to narrow the distance between Ireland and Australia. From these unique stories and experiences a picture of Melbourne’s Irish community emerges, yet across each account there is a desire to connect a community whose stories have all too often gone untold.

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Imagining the Impossible: The Fantastic as Media Entertainment and Play

Imagining the Impossible: The Fantastic as Media Entertainment and Play

This is a Danish funded network of researchers (Danish, UK, US, Australia) working with media fictions. The network asks why the fantastic has exploded in contemporary entertainment, how we create, design, and engage with the fantastic, and why the fantastic is important for human existence.

Fund

Danmarks Frie Forskningsfond/The Danish Independent Research Fund

Investigators

Angela Ndalianis (TMT), Rikke Schubart (University of Southern Denmark), Amanda Howell (Griffith University), Anita Nell Bech Albertsen (University of Southern Denmark), Jakob Ion Wille (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts), Jesper Juul (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts), Cristina Bacchilega(University of Hawaii), Marc Malmdorf Andersen (Aarhus University), Margrethe Bruun Vaage (University of Kent), Mathias Clasen (Aarhus University), Sara Mosberg Iversen (University of Southern Denmark), Stephen Joyce (Aarhus University),  Stephanie Green (Griffith University)

Led by Associate Rikke Schubart (University of Southern Denmark) Imagining the Impossible This is a Danish funded network of researchers (Danish, UK, US, Australia) working with media fictions and production design in television, film, video games, and literature.

Investigators adopt an interdisciplinary approach and apply theories and methods from tradition media/film/TV/VR fields while also engaging in audience observation and biometric measuring (e.g. heart rate, eye-tracking), and theories of embodiment, particularly as applied to engagement with the experience of the fantastic in VR.

Today, the fantastic reigns supreme in entertainment. However, we lack research in why it appeals to a broad audience, why the genre exploded after the turn of the millennium, and – our key question – why and how the fantastic invites us into play.  

We ask why and how the fantastic appeals and if the fantastic is especially suited to ask questions about human existence, pressing questions in times of ecological crisis. Our aim is to establish an interdisciplinary task force that can create a shared theoretical platform for a study of the fantastic. 

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Experiencing space: sensory encounters from Baroque Rome to neo-baroque Las Vegas

Experiencing space: sensory encounters from Baroque Rome to neo-baroque Las Vegas

The project examines how Las Vegas is emblematic of the return of baroque aesthetics that have been nurtured by consumer culture, multi-media conglomeration and digital technology. 

Fund

ARC Discovery Projects Scheme

Investigators

Angela Ndalianis (TMT)
Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University)

Experiencing space: sensory encounters from Baroque Rome to neo-baroque Las Vegas examines how Las Vegas is emblematic of the return of a baroque aesthetics that has been nurtured by consumer culture, multi-media conglomeration and digital technology. The project develops a new methodology for the study of baroque and neo-baroque cultures grounded in sensory and spatial approaches.

It examines how the metropolis as represented in the extreme by Las Vegas in the C21st gives new expression to the structural and formal qualities of the historical baroque, as represented by C17th Rome. The research has been funded by the ARC Discovery Projects Scheme, and Angela Ndalianis and Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University) are co-investigators. Outcomes have included article and book publications, presentations, and symposia.

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